FAQ about wraps

What size of a wrap should I choose?

The right size of a wrap is chosen according to your clothing size. Our Assistant will help you with this!

How long are your wraps?

The following chart contains lengths of individual sizes after washing. When first washing the wrap at 40°C it shrinks approximately about 10 % depending on the blend of the material.
 
Size 2 3 4 5 6 7
Length 2,7 m 3,2 m 3,7 m 4,2 m 4,7 m 5,2 m

What kind of a wrap to choose in summer?

If you search for a pure summer wrap, we recommend you try the linen, silk, bamboo or tencel blends. These are perfect in removing sweat quickly and thus creating a very pleasant climate. Merino wool blend is also suitable for summer babywearing, however it is important to choose the right wrap that is not too thick and the wool percentage in it is lower or softened by silk, tencel and other blends.
100% cotton wrap still stays the most universal option for the whole year – and also good for summer days.

What kind of a wrap to choose in winter?

The typical winter yarn is wool. Our wraps contain the finer merino wool that is suitable even for people with sensitive skin, who normally do not support wool. Merino wool has great thermoregulatory properties, it can warm up but also prevents overheating and keeps the child and the parent dry.
The universal all-cotton wrap is also suitable for babywearing in winter just like for the whole year.

It is possible to have one universal wrap for the whole babywearing period?

Of course, it is possible to carry your baby for the whole period in just one wrap, we recommend choosing wraps with medium and high density. Although in some moments it is going to be about compromises, you can manage it without problems.
Nevertheless, most mothers choose the thinner wraps for their new-born babies, enjoying wearing their little ones in these soft and super-easy-to-wrap-with slings, and later change their wrap for something of higher density according to their preferences.

What is a wrap weave type and how it affects its characteristics?

Weave type is a way how the yarns of the warp and weft are interwoven. In most of our wraps we use the atlas weave that is smooth, shiny and pleasant to touch. If not stated otherwise, the wraps are woven by this technique. The wrap is thin in hand, has a soft bounce to it and is easy to tighten.
Besides that our offer also contains double weaves Airy Triweave and Rich Triweave. You can learn more about them in this blog.

What is a second grade wrap?

Wraps of second grades usually contain a visual flaw, e.g. skipped yarns, several weft knots, or the weft knot situated at a visible place (in the middle of the wrap, and we did not notice during cutting but only during the final control). Of course, these wraps too can be returned unused within 14 days; more about individual flaws can be find here.

Are your wraps safe?

wraps are solely made of yarns certified according to OEKO-TEX® Standard 100 Product Class 1 and the dyeing process meets the strictest criteria for children under three years of age. The quality of our products was also proved by an independent laboratory.
The wrap is also very strong and to be torn apart it would have to be loaded with hundreds of kilograms. Thus if all babywearing safety rules are met, the wrap poses absolutely no risk to the child.

The linen used in your wraps – where is it from?

Flax is the most traditional crop in Slovakia and also an environmental sustainability hero. The high quality linen we use in our wraps comes from a European spinning mill with more than 100 years of history. The flax is harvested on northern European fields watered by a natural rainwater, without using chemicals. The linen fibre naturally contains small knots and naps that add a very interesting structure to the fabric. This rustic looks makes it very popular and sought-after blend.

Can you make me a wrap that is already sold out in your e-shop?

Most of our wraps are made as limited editions. Some of them are continually woven and put in stock. To make a sold-out wrap it is necessary to dye a huge amount of yarn again, weave it, etc. Thus, it is not possible to make just one wrap.
If you are interested in a wrap that is already sold-out, be sure to write us via Messenger or hello@sestrice.com and we will inform you if the chosen wrap will be made again or we will offer you alternatives.

The wrap I bought from you seems a bit lighter than on promo pics – why is that?

Monitors and displays tend to distort the real colours, but there might be more to it – you have to wash the wrap. By washing, the wrap shrinks a bit and the coloured yarn gets more visible due to white warp retreating a little, thus the wrap becomes richer in colours.

How to break in a wrap? Mine still seems stiff and tough.

The best way to break in a wrap is to babywear :) and work with it daily. You can also sit and sleep on it, iron regularly (with respect to its blend and label instructions); you can even try using it as a swing or tumble dry it on a short programme. The wraps we recommend for newborns are soft and pliable right after first washing and easy to wrap with – there is no need to break them in.

Caring instructions

Do I have to wash the wrap before first use?

Definitely yes – by washing the wrap shrinks to its final length, the fibres fit into each other and the production process is thus completed.
Washing is also recommended because of hygiene, seeing that the wrap is in direct contact with your child.

How should I take care about the wrap?

Each wrap has a label with wrap care instructions situated at its inclined hem. Besides that each wrap is packed with a leaflet with detailed information about washing and care. Special attention should be focused at wraps made of sensitive materials like silk or wool.

I didn’t wash the wrap before using it for the first time – is it damaged now?

No, it’s definitely not damaged :). Our wraps are strong and durable and such one single use simply won’t destroy them. Wash the wrap according to instructions and keep on babywearing.

I washed the wrap in washing powder or / and with fabric conditioner – what now?

Wash the wrap several times in clear water with a bit of vinegar in the fabric softener compartment (even 6 times is ok). You can also try prewash, main cycle and 3x rinse. The wrap has to be washed until it’s completely free of the washing powder or/and fabric conditioner.

This applies to cotton / linen / hemp blends.

Silk or wool blends need to be washed in hands. We also recommend to wash the tencel blend in hands when washed in such intense manner (to avoid naps and hairy look).

Then happily keep on babywearing:)

I have just washed the wrap and it’s spotted – what now?

This can happen with new wraps whose fibres are treated to be stronger during weaving. Such wraps don’t absorb water as easily, thus the wrap won’t get completely soaked in the washing machine. When being pulled out after washing, the dry (unsoaked) places resemble spots.

This can also happen with new-generation washing machines whose added amount of water is based on the weight of the load – the washing machine simply doesn’t add enough water, resulting into “spotted” wrap. If this happens, try soaking up the wrap separately in a bath tub and then continue with regular washing.

Pills appeared on my wrap, can I use a peeler?

Yes, it’s absolutely OK to use a peeler :)

Pills appear naturally as a result of using the wrap. The cotton yarns used in our wraps are those of combed cotton – that means the fibres are “combed” in one direction. The length of the fibres determines its strength – the longer the fibres, the stronger the cotton (and more expensive as well). Pilling is one of the typical cotton characteristics. To eliminate pilling, producers can use various chemical treatments of fibres or add blends (like polyester). Our wraps and carriers are made of 100% cotton seeing that we want the materials we use for our children to be as natural as possible, without chemical treatment.

Weave type is another factor that affects pilling – each type has its pros and cons. The smooth atlas weave we generally use for our wraps and carriers is – especially compared to the twill weave – soft and mouldable and enables us to weave many different designs. This weave makes the rich colours of the warp (or weft) stand out, but on the other hand, the warp has “longer fibres” that are exposed and the individual small fibres can detach and entangle with others – thus the pill is born. Even the most expensive yarns tend to pill if they are woven in this kind of “exposed” way. One way to avoid pills is to wash the clothes inside out – which, of course, is not possible with wraps or carriers.

So the pilling is inevitable – but it can be softened by ironing or using a peeler.

Do you recommend using gall soap to remove stains?

In terms of eliminating dirt and stains, gall soap is very effective and can be used with our products. However, it is very important to follow the instructions, avoid applying it on the material for longer than 15 minutes and to wash the soap out of the product thoroughly.

After using gall soap we recommend an acid rinse – e.g. 10% citric acid solution or a laundry rinse. Be careful to put the rinse in the fabric softener compartment and not in the laundry gel compartment.

In terms of eco and animal friendly approach, we recommend alternatives like coconut oil soaps or olive soaps with lemon extract.   

How to remove fat stains (e.g. blood, breast milk…)?

Cotton, tencel, linen, hemp
First and foremost, when removing fat, greasy stains it is important to rinse them in cold water, seeing that hot water will cause the stains to “cook” into the fabric. You can then use gall soap (or its alternative), allow it to take effect for 10 – 15 minutes (no longer) and wash the soap out of the product thoroughly. After using gall soap we recommend an acid rinse – e.g. 10% citric acid solution or a laundry rinse. Be careful to put the rinse in the fabric softener compartment and not in the laundry gel compartment.

Merino, silk
First and foremost, when removing fat, greasy stains it is important to rinse them in cold water, seeing that hot water will cause the stains to “cook” into the fabric. Then take a small bowl and prepare a concentrated solution of water and silk and wool washing liquid, rub the fabric gently with it, wash and rinse – all following the hand wash instructions. As wool and silk are animal fibres, you can also apply low-concentrated and short –time acid rinse.

Another way is to put small amount of the wool and silk washing liquid on the dry stain and wait around 15 minutes. Then wash the wrap in 30° water without adding any more washing liquid.   

How to remove common stains (e.g. food, spice, grass, poop)?

Cotton, tencel, linen, hemp
Rinse the stains in cold water first. The longer they stay on the fabric, the harder is to get rid of them, so be quick. Then you can then use gall soap (or its alternative), allow it to take effect for 10 – 15 minutes (no longer) and wash the soap out of the product thoroughly. After using gall soap we recommend an acid rinse – e.g. 10% citric acid solution or a laundry rinse. Be careful to put the rinse in the fabric softener compartment and not in the laundry gel compartment. Another way is to use a stain removal spray (e.g. Sonett) and then wash the wrap.

Merino, silk
Rinse the stains in cold water first. Then take a small bowl and prepare a concentrated solution of water and silk and wool washing liquid, rub the fabric gently with it, wash and rinse – all following the hand wash instructions. As wool and silk are animal fibres, you can also apply low-concentrated and short –time acid rinse.

Another way is to put small amount of the wool and silk washing liquid on the dry stain and wait around 15 minutes. Then wash the wrap in 30° water without adding any more washing liquid.   

How to remove colour (dye transfer) stains from a wrap?

Cotton, linen, hemp, tencel
You can try washing the wrap with colour capture sheets (add 4 to 5 sheets or even more, if needed). Repeat until the wrap is in its original condition.

Another way is to fill the bath tub with 40°C water, add 2 tablespoons of baking soda and stir thoroughly; then put the wrap in and leave it there for some time. Afterwards wash the wrap in washing machine on 40 °C with liquid washing detergent, 2 wash cycles in a row.

You can also try using a gall soap (or its alternative), allow it to take effect for 10 – 15 minutes (no longer) and wash the soap out of the product thoroughly. After using gall soap we recommend an acid rinse – e.g. 10% citric acid solution or a laundry rinse. Be careful to put the rinse in the fabric softener compartment and not in the laundry gel compartment.

Merino, silk 
We recommend to take a small bowl and prepare a concentrated solution of water and silk and wool washing liquid, rub the fabric gently with it, then wash with colour capture sheets and rinse – all following the hand wash instructions.

Can I use essential oils instead of a fabric softener?

In case you like your wrap scented and want to use essential oils, we recommend to apply it to your wrists; if you want to scare away the clothes moths, we recommend you soak an ear pick in a lavender oil and put it where your wraps are stored. Your wrap absorbs the scent of your perfume or clothes either way, and your baby might be sensitive to it – thus we always recommend to be cautious when using essential oils such way.

My merino & tencel blend wrap is colour bleeding, what now?

The wrap has probably been washed in improper washing detergent that destabilized the colour in wool fibres. Conventional detergents are more alkaline than those suitable for wool and can thus disturb the stability of the dyed wool fibre. That’s why it is so important to wash the woollen fabrics only with wool wash detergent. We recommend you wash the wrap with the right detergent several times until the colour bleeding stops.